Question

Studying, Academics and Grades

Thu Nov 22, 2018 5:00 am

How useless is health science?

Science is a subject that I’ve always been really interested in and after taking a course called health care in grade 11 health science seems like something I wanna go into; however, I’ve heard and read over and over again to not go into health sciences as it’s a basically useless degree. Is that actually the case or a slight over exaggeration? Medicine is something I’ve been looking into but I realize that you don’t have to take science/ health science for that, and that’s it’s unbelievably hard to get into and I want to take something that will give me a good backup plan too. Health science is something I want to take because it genuinely interests me, not just so I can maybe be a doctor: the fact that it combines the aspects of science (bio, anatomy) with some social sciences (ethics in healthcare, etc) really seems interesting to me. However I don’t want to go into it if I’m gonna be jobless and in a pile of student debt after four years, but at the same time I don’t want to take a program I will hate. How hard is it to go into a masters degree program? Also, I’ve heard that you can go into and work at health Canada with a health science degree? That’s sounds of interesting, is it true? Also, before anyone mentions this, computer science, business and engineering are subjects that I HATE so I really do not want to go into those. I realize these kind of questions are annoying but I’ve tried doing research and not too much has come up. Any insight would be really helpful and appreciated!!

Asked by romikas022642734

uThink Member

9 answers

Thu Nov 22, 2018 5:00 am

It sounds like you've done some research and know the answer to this question already, yet are hoping that others here will tell you what you want to hear. Look, university was never meant to get anyone a job; that's why we have colleges and skilled trades programs. University is a place of higher academic learning - mainly a lot of theory, critical thinking, reading and writing, and little practical value otherwise. This is especially true for traditional degrees that are high in theory (i.e. health science) and little in practical value. I mean, what do you bring to the table for an employer to hire you over someone who studied applied mathematics, computer science, business, engineering, architecture, actuarial science, nursing, etc.? I can learn almost everything you learn in a health science or sociology program by going to the library and signing out some books and just reading up on it on the Internet.

 Health Canada? There are tens of thousands of science students graduating from university every year. Not everyone can work in Health Canada now, can they? Government is harder to get into nowadays than even Bay Street. You're competing with people who have excellent public sector/NGO experiences, advanced degrees (masters, PhD, MD, JD, etc.), and strong references and networks. Simply getting a degree in sciences isn't enough to get you there. What other traits do you have to stand out from the thousands of other applicants?

I'm not going to tell you what you want to hear. If you want a job, then don't do health science. If you're willing to work your ass off in undergrad to get stellar grades, research experiences and references, to then pursue another 2-5+ years in graduate/professional schooling for an area within sciences/healthcare that you want to specialize in, then by all means, do a health science degree. I don't even understand this question to be honest. How are you going to be qualified as a professional to do anything within the science/healthcare field with a 4 year health science degree alone? Can we put patients' lives in your hand? Can you perform surgery? Can you advise on medications? Can you set healthcare policies?

It's not the fact that nobody wants to hire you with a health science degree. Its' the fact that you spend 4 years in university learning a lot of theory that has little practical value in the entry level job market, and within the sciences/health care fields itself, you're not qualified to do anything in comparison to people who have PhDs and professional degrees. A masters degree is also just as useless on its own. Most science students do a masters degree to later pursue a PhD, or hope that a masters degree will help them get into medical school or some other professional program.

I have a close friend who works in Health Canada as a policy analyst. He has a masters degree and law degree, went on to specialize in health law, worked for international health organizations, and now works at Health Canada as a policymaker. I'm not saying that you can't do it, but you just need to understand that getting into a masters program is much easier than getting a job in the government/Bay Street. Everyone wants these jobs.

 http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/prospectives ... grams.aspx You can browse through some grad/professional degrees here. I linked U of T because they seem to have most programs listed. Keep in mind that there is a vast difference between an academic masters degree (i.e. MSc in biology) and a professional degree (i.e. medicine, dentistry, law, optometry, pharmacy, etc.). People with masters degrees are struggling too because again, theory, while professional programs are brutally competitive and will set you up nicely if you can get in - and everyone and their mother wants to be a lawyer or doctor now.The point is, I admire those who stick with their convictions and follow their true passions, overcome hurdles and barriers to reach their goal. But if you're someone who is only 17/18 and already know now that you probably won't get into these competitive programs like medicine, etc., then cut your losses and find something else to do. It's fine to want to study health sciences in university, but why then ask about the job market, which doesn't correlate here. This is not what a health science degree and most other BSc degrees are intended for to begin with. There is also a LOT of information online on this topic. You can easily google graduate and professional degree requirements. I was making a list of law school and medical school requirements back when I was in Gr.11. I planned everything out and knew more than even university students. I'm in medical school now. If you're serious about getting a top tier job in the sciences/healthcare, then you really need to be an outstanding student and put in the effort and have the drive to accomplish these things. 

tim_eragon3028597

uThink Member

Thu Nov 22, 2018 5:00 am

Health science degree is useless, in terms of jobs. You can't really have a job with a health science degree except to do research with your professor. Yes, in order to go into med school you do not need to go into health sciences. You can even go to music or arts and have a high gpa to go to med. The only thing is, if you're really passionate about being a doctor or surgeon , you already know you have to go to school alot. But anyways, if you want to be either of those two or close, I suggest you do health science in university and try as much as you can to have a good gpa to go to med school. This is because, if you get a degree in another field and go to med, it would be hard to follow up b/c you don't have knowledge of it. People that go to med school are mostly people that took health sciences or close. So if you are really passionate, and like going to school and love chem and biology then i recommend you take a health sci program; it would be worth it. Otherwise, there are many other fields that don't require going to med school but it's within health. For example you can go to uni and study nursing which is 4 years. After 4 years you get your rpn and can continue your studies by taking masters for nursing to have your rn (registered nurse) . There a level of nurse that is close to that of a doctor, i forgot, but it depends on like jut taking your masters and phd for nursing. There's also forensic psychology or psychology. I'm also in grade 12, and wanted to be a nurse (sort off), but i was not impressed with my marks (low 70s average). I had to think of what i want to be that helps people and still work in medical field. So now i'm working on being a social worker instead of psychologist because i can work in places like schools and hospitals, agencies etc (lots of job and opportunities). My average rn is 89% (got my midterm this monday). Im aiming for mid 90s for final. I can take bachelor, masters and even phd for social work (which im planning). There's some programs you can take that is health wise for example kinesiology etc. My mom is a nurse and some ppl (family) around me are in health sciences so if you have any question, you can email me.... eniolaolaleye17@gmail.com

Peaceeee❣

eniolaolaleye171269569

uThink Member

Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:00 am

Generally good advice, but you're wrong about the fact that most medical students have a science background. This is not true. They teach you everything from scratch in medical school. There is a reason that a) med schools don't care what you studied in undergrad and b) have few or no prerequisite requirements.Compare the prerequisites for medical school to dentistry and pharmacy. That tells you a lot in itself. My friend did a commerce degree and is at U of T's medical school now. It's a common misconception to think that a science degree gives you any competitive advantage in medical school or the medical school admissions process. Most health science, life science, etc. graduates never get into medical school. It's the same thing as all these criminology and political science grads thinking they're going to get into law school. Most of them never do, and you certainly don't need an arts background to perform well in law school. 

tim_eragon3028597

uThink Member

Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:00 am

This was actually really helpful. Thank you!!

romikas022642734

uThink Member

Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:11 pm

Hello guys! It is common knowledge that medicine has several disputable questions and one of the brightest ones is using marijuana. There are many contradictory opinions and I dealt only with cbd. So, my experience was absolutely positive and even ImProb confirms that this is a good thing

NobelCat

uThink Member

Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:49 pm

Hi! Very interesting to read your opinion about health science. I've always was sure that it is really useful, but your article made me doubt about it. My doctor recommended me to check the info about greenroads and I want to hear your opinion about it too, is it nice to use ut if I have some mental troubles? I have a very bad sleep and I'm very nervous sometimes.

Bill Shiphr

uThink Member

Sun Jul 26, 2020 11:37 am

I do not think that Health science is a useless field. You must surely go for it since you have already mentioned that it is your passion. You can read a detailed article by clicking on this https://www.ourpaleolife.com/whole30-me ... cery-list/ link to know about the dieting plans and their impact on the health science. Anyway, my sincere suggestion is that you must choose the health sciences. It is okay if you do not want to be a doctor because there are plenty of other significant options for you.

Yvette Adams

uThink Member

Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:05 pm

I don't think that I can agree with that. Health science is where we get a new medicine. Maybe you heard about Blessed CBD oil? It's a thing that gets from cannabidiol. And it has a lot of benefits: providing relief for anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It is also marketed to promote sleep. Without health science, it would be even impossible.

MarkUltra

uThink Member

Mon Nov 16, 2020 5:36 pm

Since childhood, the phrase "Take care of your health" has been put into our heads. Health is the most important thing in our lives. It is necessary to be engaged in disease prevention, it is much easier than after a long treatment, and then recover from the disease. And there is less damage, if you initially pay proper attention to your health. I neglected my health, which I regret very much. But I was helped, visit this website to learn more.

Carol Lee

uThink Member


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