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m0hd03

Computer Programming Courses

Hello there. I had an urgent question I wanted to ask. I am currently in grade 10 at my local high school. I am looking to go into a computer science/software engineering field. My school offers both computer science and computer engineering courses, both of which I was looking to get in my Grade 10 year to increase my knowledge of computer engineering with these elective courses. However, due to a timetable clash with my required courses and inadequate spots, I wasn’t able to get any of those two courses. My question is that if the same happens in Grade 11 (the timetable clash), after which I will not be able to take the Grade 12 courses in these fields,  my chances of being accepted at University of Waterloo, University of Toronto, Ottawa University, or McMaster University decrease? If so, then what should I do to increase my chances of being accepted into these universities?

Furthermore, I was looking for alternatives to the computer science and computer engineering courses. I looked into several different institutions such as Udemy as well as self-teaching myself some programming languages to strengthen myself for acceptance into the university. Some courses I looked into were:

https://www.udemy.com/python-the-complete-python-developer-course/
https://www.udemy.com/complete-python-bootcamp/

Which course should I start with? I also searched up some books online too, which I have listed below:

Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (by Michael Dawson) -https://www.amazon.ca/Python-Programming-Absolute-Beginner-Third/dp/1435455002

Prelude to Programming: Concepts and Design (by Stewart Venit and Elizabeth Drake) – https://www.amazon.ca/Prelude-Programming-Concepts-Design/dp/1292042575/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1537076863&sr=1-1&keywords=Prelude+to+Programming%3A+Concepts+and+Design

Kindly guide me which course or book I should start with for this year. Are there any other options available for me to compensate for the loss of these courses? Thank You in advance! Please reply asap.

4 Answers

  1. If your looking to learn Computer Programming, there are some great courses online that are just as valuable as books if not more. A course that I'm doing right now is "Object-Oriented programming with Java".  
    http://moocfi.github.io/courses/2013/programming-part-1/ 

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  2. Your first stop should be to research the actual admission requirements for the programs you want to apply to. MyBlueprint (if your school uses it) has links or some other excellent resources are eINFO for Ontario universities 
    http://www.electronicinfo.ca/ 
    and UniversityStudy for all Canadian universities
    https://www.universitystudy.ca/search-programs/
    You can also check the admissions pages on the websites for whichever schools to which you wish to apply.
    Neither high school computer engineering or computer science are prerequisites for the programs you are considering because they are elective courses and not all schools offer them. So while it would be nice to be able to take them, not having them won't prevent you from being admitted. By all means however, if you want to undertake some studies on your own, that could be a good choice and a good show of taking initiative.

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  3. Taking high-school CS classes don't come close to what you would learn in CS in uni.  The only real thing to increase your chances of getting into the top schools is just high grades. Unless you get a 4 or higher in AP CS A  those courses don't mean much, even AP CSP doesn't bring much to the table if you don't have high 80's to low 90's.

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  4. Those courses are not pre-reqs so it makes no difference whether or not you've taken them. Universities don't care.

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